SoundIntuition

april 2018 abstracts

sound prActice in action

April 2018 Abstracts
  • Speaker Series
  • April 2018 Abstracts

April 2018 Abstracts

Restoring Binaural and Spatial Hearing in Cochlear Implant Users

Dr. Ruth LitovskyRuth Litovsky, PhD
Cochlear implant criteria have shifted over the years, such that the standard of care is to promote inputs to both ears. There is a growing population of patients who receive bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs), with the goal of providing the same benefits that normal-hearing listeners demonstrate when they can hear with both ears compared with one ear. The first type of benefit is that of bilateral hearing, which occur when auditory information is available at each ear, and include the monaural head shadow as well as reduced cognitive load. Binaural benefits are due to the ability of the brain to integrate inputs arriving at the brain from both ears, and these abilities are mediated by binaural nuclei in the brainstem. Several factors play a key role in determining if patients will demonstrate bilateral as well as binaural sensitivity. We are exploring these factors using several experimental approaches, in adults and children. First, this presentation will discuss speech understanding in noise, and sound localization findings in adults and children, with focus on factors such the age at onset of deafness, age at implantation, and evidence for improvement over several years of bilateral listening experience. Second, studies on non-sensory factors such as language processing in children will be described. A third area is that of attention, executive function and working memory. Fourth, cognitive load and listening effort as measured with pupil dilation will be described for recent and ongoing studies. A fifth area of research uses research interfaces that bypass clinical processors and aim to restore binaural cues with fidelity. Finally, studies on patients with single sided deafness who receive cochlear implants (SSD-CI) are novel and explore the benefit of adding an implant contralateral to an acoustic ear. We are currently studying a small but growing patient group to investigate outcomes on spatial hearing and speech understanding in noise. 

Learner Outcomes

1. Upon completion, participants will be able to understand mechanisms of binaural hearing and potential benefits from having cochlear implants in both ears or one hearing ear and one implanted ear.
2.  Upon completion, participants will be able to understand recent findings in bilaterally implanted and single-sided implanted individuals, as well as assessment tools used to determine benefits, and auditory plasticity. 
3. Upon completion, participants will be able to understand what potential limitations exist and what future directions hold for bilateral cochlear implantation and implantation in single sided deaf individuals.

Get Timed Agenda here

Click here to register for the April 27th, 2018
 

The importance of Bilateral Hearing in Children:
Research Updates from Archie’s Cochlear Implant Laboratory

Dr. Karen GordonKaren Gordon, PhD
We suggest that binaural hearing is essential for children as they often need to hear one voice amidst many other sounds. We think of these typical situations, such as the playground, as the "child's cocktail party" but with several important distinctions compared to the adult equivalent; the child's environment is more frequent, more dynamic and often involves more target voices. Children who have asymmetric hearing (one better hearing ear) do not have normal access to binaural hearing and can find it challenging to hear in many situations. We have studied the consequences of asymmetric hearing in children on the developing auditory brain and on abilities to hear speech in both quiet and noise. Effects include increased listening effort relative to normal hearing peers and an aural preference for the better hearing ear. We thus suggest that asymmetric hearing must be avoided by providing bilateral hearing to children early in life. This can be done by providing the most appropriate hearing device (e.g. cochlear implant, hearing aid) to each ear with hearing loss. We have studied children who receive bilateral cochlear implants and children who use a cochlear implant in one ear and acoustic hearing (through a hearing aid or normal hearing) in the other ear. Once bilateral hearing is provided to children with hearing loss, we can work to better establish binaural hearing so that these children can hear and respond to sounds all around them in typical situations such as the playground, the classroom, and at home.

Learner Outcomes

To learn that:
1. There is a difference between bilateral and binaural hearing
2. Listening effort reduces with bilateral hearing
3. Delayed access to bilateral hearing results in the aural preference syndrome
4. Further work is needed to improve binaural hearing for children with hearing loss

Get Timed Agenda here

Click here to register for the April 27th, 2018
 

Listening Effort in Individuals with Hearing Loss

Dr. Andrew DimitrijevicAndrew Dimitrijevic, PhD
Hearing loss doesn't only involve a loss of hearing perception, but also a loss in ease of listening, which can lead to increased overall fatigue and social isolation. In noisy situations, listeners must focus and exert a lot of mental effort to listen and pay attention. Individuals with typical hearing usually expend increased listening effort within non-ideal listening environments only (e.g. restaurants, bars, etc.), but individuals with hearing loss and hearing technology need to expend more listening effort at all times because despite technological advances, auditory input is not always clear and easy to hear. Therefore when individuals with hearing aids and cochlear implants must listen for an entire day at a school, conference or at work, they often feel exhausted. In this presentation, neural mechanisms of how sound is processed and perceived in quiet and noisy environments will be shared, and cognitive aspects of hearing such as attention and memory, which influence overall auditory and communicative functioning will be discussed. The goal of this presentation is to help the learner dissociate the sensory and cognitive aspects of hearing loss so that ideas for additional tools and/or strategies for rehabilitation can be shared and discussed.

Learner Outcomes

1. Describe auditory attention and its relationship to listening effort.
2. List factors that contribute to listening fatigue. 
3. Describe how knowing about listening effort can shape aural rehabilitation. 

Get Timed Agenda here

Click here to register for the April 27th, 2018
 

MED-EL Innovations in Technology and Services

Judy Horvath, MA, LSLS Cert. AVEd
Judy has over 28 years of experience in the field of hearing loss. These experiences include teaching in public school settings, providing therapy in clinical settings, Special Education administration, adjunct university instructor and as director of both an Auditory-Verbal Therapy Center and the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Family Resource Center at the University of Miami. Judy co-created and implemented a Listening and Spoken Language Summer Camp experience for children with hearing loss in Michigan that continues today. She, in partnership with the Florida Department of Education, developed and implemented training modules for teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing.  Judy’s core beliefs and desire to support those navigating hearing loss is her main objective in her current role as Director of Consumer Engagement and Rehabilitation for MED-EL US and Canada.  This diverse team of professionals creates and implements initiatives that support children and adults with hearing loss and the professionals who serve them.

 

Learner Outcomes
Participants will:
1. Explain Tri-formance, the 3 unique components of MED-ELs CI System.
2. List at least 3 ways MED-EL innovations and services support patients and the professionals who serve them.
3. Share one key factor related to reliability of MED-EL innovations.

Get Timed Agenda here

Click here to register for the April 27th, 2018
 

Inspirational Session

Alexander Bergen
Alexander has a congenital bilateral severe to profound hearing loss, which was diagnosed early in life. Shortly following fitting of hearing aids, Alexander’s family were enrolled in Auditory-Verbal Therapy at the Learning to Listen Foundation to help Alexan der learn to listen and talk.   This presentation will provide the audience with insight on the journey in discovering, exploring, and participating in a world of sound and how with the support of his family and many professionals, Alexander learned to take responsibility for hid own listening skills development as he matured, and became empowered to use his listening and spoken communication skills to accomplish his goals and dreams.  This presentation will provide professionals with the clients’ (family and child) perspective on what was helpful and what could have been done differently support the family in helping Alexander achieve his listening and spoken language, academic and life outcomes. Alexander currently works as an Analyst at the AML Group at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC).

Learner Outcomes:
1. Identify those supports that professional provide to families during time of intervention (across all ages).
2. Explain the impact of a collaborative relationship with those professionals (e.g. audiologist, auditory-verbal therapists, speech-language pathologists etc.) on the family’s and Alexander’s outcomes.
3. Discuss the challenges that were encountered by the family and alexander during the intervention period, and life as lived currently, and ways that they were/are overcome.